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Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
of russia today, assad about offers of safe passage to another country in exchange for leaving power. >> he warned that foreign intervention in syria would have a domino impact around the world. we begin with the latest. >> here is where the first protests of assad took place. this video claims to show the result of a government air strike on the city's great mosque. meanwhile, rebels say they have taken one of the two remaining government-controlled posts along the turkish border. in a rare interview, bashar al- assad was defiant. speaking to russian television, he ruled out the possibility he might go into exile. >> i am syrian. i will live and die in syria. >> assad warned the west against military intervention in the country and said such a move would have global ramifications and warned any intervention would have what he called a domino effect. meanwhile, syrian opposition politicians are meeting in the qatari capital to try to form a unified group. the opposition is under pressure from the west to create a government in waiting that would be ready to take over if and when assad is no
of russia? and china and the position of the other members of the security council. >> you know, i've talked to all of them. and i was pleasantly surprised that in spite of their, you know, what kofi annan called fingerpointing, they actually have all of them a reasonably responsible attitude. and all they need is really get together and try to find you know, stop pointing their fingers at the other guy. and really work out work out whatever disagreements they have and the process. >> rose: let's take russia, i have interviewed all the foreign ministers here at this table there a all kinds of issues that divide them. i don't think the russians, you correct me, are committed to assad. >> no, not at all. >> they're not offering-- they are not committed to him they are basically saying we think there has to be some kind of negotiation to solve this thing rather than -- >> what they are saying is that it has to be syrian process, syrian lead process which everybody agrees to. we are against military intervention from outside. and whatever the syrians agree to is welcome to us except perhaps if y
edge -- >> questions to editor she mentioned the cold war. the request and asking what role does russia play in the world going forward. >> it is -- in a challenge of the finding its identity under totally different circumstances. russia has been an imperial power and it has had domestic support by its efforts in asia, the middle east and europe, depending on where it was, now russia has the problem of a declining population. declining russian population and muslim population that is forward of the muslim world. 3,000 miles from china which is based tricky dick nightmare in the sense that there are thirty million russians are on one side and 1 billion chinese on the other end the middle east which is an ideological nightmare and in europe, a historically difficult one for them so how -- and yet the image russia has of its leadership is that they have to be considered as a principal country in order to be taken seriously so fundamentally russia has to look for a pattern of cooperation but found methods of doing it but russia is not strategic to the west, bringing pressure on its neighbor
pressure on russia, china and iran to stop supporting this regime, and then this would be useful, or supporting militarily the opposition or the interfering by the nato to make free zone and no-fly zone. >> reporter: russia and china have repeatedly vetoed u.n. security council resolutions on imposing sanctions against syria. without their support, the international efforts can only put limited pressure on president assad. diplomats here are still hoping their efforts will help in some part to end the conflict in syria. however, after 20 months of violence, they've learned getting peace will take time. akira saheki, nhk world, tokyo. >>> satellite images show north korea could be preparing to launch another rocket. researchers at johns hopkins university in the united states say they have observed the first two stages of what appears to be a long-range missile. these images of the launch site in tongchang-ri on the west coast of north korea were captured on monday. researchers say they show trailers carrying the first two stages of a three-stage rocket. they say north korean offi
! >> the biggest geopolitical threat facing america you said russia. not al qaeda, you said russia. and the 1980s are calling to ask for their foreign policy back. (laughter and applause). >> jon: well, that was a little hackie. i mean that was -- that was a it will roasty. i wouldn't (bleep) your foreign policy with margaret thatcher's (bleep), come on! hickory dickory dock, your geopolitical understanding can suck my -- (laughter) sorry. that's -- no, please don't because then i'll do it again some night. (laughter) so the president had a good night. must have felt pretty confident because he was letting his professor or y'all side shine through. especially when it came to one country. >> we've created partnerships throughout the region to deal with extremism. in somalia, in yemen, in pakistan. >> jon: what? really? (laughter) pah-kee-stahn? really? suddenly you're a guy who's desperate to prove you once roomed with a foreign exchange student? (laughter) look, this is america, we don't use the pronunciation locally. we don't say may-hee-co or frahnce. mexico, france. pakistan. (laughter) all in
meaningful contributions now? the contribution does not have to be militarily? russia, i would suggest, should be called upon to step up and belly up to the u.n. security council. they should exert influence. day, i suggest, are the most influential at this time, and they have the ability, number one, to stop supporting this regime that is slaughtering its citizens, to stop, by its acquiescence, standing on the sidelines and letting it happen while the rest of the world realize its hands. >> how do you accomplish that? >> i think they can assert influence in syria. they are one of the few countries that really can at this point. iran, forget it. >> how? what they can support the security camera resolutions, which thus far we have been unable to achieve -- security council resolutions, which we have been unable to achieve. >> what i think we are talking about here is, where do we intervene? where do we not? what is the rationale for doing so or to not do so? i think it's got to be based on one fundamental principle -- our interests, our values, and our values are our interests. i say ab
to work together. >> we need more than that. we have two ways. putting pressure on russia, china and iran to stop supporting this regime and that's what will be useful or supporting military. or make free zone and no fly zone. >> the japanese government has frozen assets held in japan by assad. it took the action last year. >>> a court in south korea is dealing with a legal matter. it's will decide whether to extradite a chinese national to japan for starting a fire. the site honors japan's war dead including war criminals. tokyo police suspect a fire was set to the gate last december. he already served a ten month pri prison term for throwing four fire bombs at the embassy. officials in china want him sent home for humanitarian reasons. they say he suffers from mental illness. he said he started shrine fire because he was trying to correct their views. he wants to be sent back to china because he says he will not get a fair trial. prosecutors says he does not meet the definition of a political offender. the court has put off its decision until defense witnesses testify in two more rounds
in syria. we've seen three security council vetoes by russia and china causing many to call the u.n., essentially, ineffective in this crisis. so it's been the interplay of these three factors, i would argue, that has led syria down the path that it has taken. in terms of u.s. policy, u.s. policy is based on the objective of having assad, as president obama called for, step aside. this was back in august of 2011. the problem with u.s. policy is that it has continually been at conflict with itself in terms of how to achieve that objective while also achieving or protecting u.s. national security interests in the region. namely, i would argue, very understandable concerns about, about the impact of unseating assad and the potential for massive instability across the region. so at the crux of u.s. policy on syria, i would argue, has resided this tension of wanting assad to go but being concerned and fearful about how to achieve that objective while also seeking to maintain stability in such a volatile region of the world. now, the debate right now on syria is focused largely on this
countries like china and russia, along with our traditional allies and a number of other states across the world have stepped up to impose the sanctions together. and you saw in the intervention in libya. we're not only our traditional european allies but our arab friends also stepped in to intervene in their own backyard. that is not leading from behind. that is leading in a way that enables others to step up, share the burdens, and be part of the solution. i think that, you know, this president has adopted a very strong and smart approach to the american leadership using all of the instruments of our national power. the military, when we must, but also much stronger on diplomacy, economic instruments and so forth. when it comes to defense and defense spending, i think this is a big difference between the two campaigns. this president has put forward a very, you know, a defense budget that is strategic in that sense it is driven by strategy but it's also driven by the legal constraints of the law that has been put in place, the budget control act those passed by a bipartisan majority
. the syrian conflict. russia. this is 45 minutes. i thought i would start here. there has been a lot of conversation in this room about the transition and this country. this is happening in china. tell us a little bit about what you think this transition will bring. well of bring substantial change to china? stability or instability? >> it will bring both. let me explain. and we tend to look at transitions in the united states. people come in. they have to lie to keep orders. they have insurance. they were made to execute. this is not how transitions are working. the power is much less than that from the president of the united states. he has to govern with the consensus of the standing committee. we can judge what the problem is. he is the chairman of the board. he is the most powerful person. he had to form coalitions within the system. the manner of execution brought the country is not necessarily through the first task. each generation of leaders have reflected a certain experience that the revolutionary. they recognize that it had to be, it needed to be reformed. they have the a
degrees higher than yesterday. across northeastern china and southeastern russia and parts of north korea, this is where we find a winter storm impacting the region with snow. additional snowfall could be as much as a10 centimeters. across the rest of china, things look nice but very cold. beijing had minus 3 degrees in your morning hours. things are tapering off in myanmar where the magnitude earthquake hit near mandalay region. it will be above the norm at 32 degrees. it will remain dry the next couple of days. tokyo, as i mentioned, 22. really nice. do enjoy that weather. it's going to get colder and colder into the mid week. in the american continent we have a system pretty potent moving across kwee breck, you have a freezing rain warning across the region and then this cold front is sagging down in towards texas. along it you find wetd and windy continues. some thunderstorms will be on the severe side, especially around the arklatex region with hail of a golf ball size and tornadic activity, which cannot be ruled out. across chicago where the nfl match-up takes place in and around th
for him to step down and leave his country. in an interview that aired node russia the president, bashar al-assad, declared "i will live and die in syria." he is living now and we hope for the latter soon, he has murdered 32,000 people. a day after the british prime minister suggested a deal that would allow the leader to go safely into, i'll as a end this civil war that began 19 months ago. jonathan hunt joins us now. one could argue that a safe way out is no justice for him but maybe it would stop more murders. >>jonathan: he certainly seems to have made the decision as many experts have said, this is a fight to the end. the end for him is going to mean probably as its did for muammar qaddafi in libya, death. in this interview aired today to part on a tv stay of english language in russia he said and i quote, "i am not a put -- puppet ," and here makes cheer he will not resign or leave. and talking about whether any western powers might ultimately put boots on the ground if syria, he says and i quote, "i don't think the west is headed in this direction but if it does, nobody can predic
submarine detected 300 miles off the east coast of the united states in late october. russia navy commander announced earlier on june 1, the russian nuclear power subs would return to patrolling the world's oceans as they did in the soviet times. >> bret: jennifer griffin live at the pentagon. thank you. we're learning tonight about the new suspects in september's deadly terror attack on the u.s. mission in libya. incident about to come under scrutiny. herron has the latest. >> reporter: -- catherine herridge has the latest. >> reporter: the list of suspects extends handful of militants aligned with the group jamal network fox news learned. it takes its name from abu ahmed released from the egyptian jail in arab spring. he has close ties to al-qaeda leader ayman al-zawahiri. >> i think we are going to find out that jamal is much more active internationally across, not just in libya and egypt but elsewhere. network is involved in really exploring terrorism throughout the middle east. >> u.s. officials believe jamal established training camps in libya and in the camps that some of the fighter
arab ya and the united states and russia and the european countries. what happened in lebanon -- if left to themselves, lebanon -- which is another sad story -- they might have been able to compromise and come together as they did on a number of occasion before re '7s and '80s, and work things out somehow. find some sort of system and muddle through this. but as they say in real estate, location is everything. and lebanon being between syria and israel, and of course syria itself being on the border of israel, lebanon, iraq, south of turkey, you're not going to be -- you cannot be the switzerland over the middle east. are going to have outside influences which usually exacerbate the situation and lengthen the time of the civil war. >> and so let's talk a little bit now, shifting the perspective, to the personal connections that you have to the house of assad. i would love for you to give us a good feel for, who is this man who is the president and how did he change over the time that you've known him? seems like there was a definitive time around 2005-2006 that you say he shif
efforts to persuade russia d china to work with us at the u.n. security council. i will take every opportunity to urge my russian and chinese colleagues to support the political and diplomatic solution to the conflict in syria. without such a solution everything that they and we most fear is coming closer, including ever-greater loss of life, instability in neighboring countries and an opportunity for extremists to pursue their own ends. the basis for such a political settlement is clear: a credible alternative to the assad regime is emerging that has the growing support of the arab league, the european union, the united states and an in's cooing number -- increasing number of countries, and we have an agreed basis for transition which all permanent members of the u.n. security council signed up to in june. but in the absence of that political and diplomat you can solution, we will not rule out any option, and in accordance with international law where it might save innocent lives in syria and prevent the destabilization of a region that remains critical to the security ofhe united
here feel syria's main ally, russia, would find a solution to the crisis. >> the anglican church has a new leader. after a lengthy appointment process, the former oil company executive and current bishop of durham, justin welby, has been officially announced as the new archbishop of canterbury. he'll take the top job at the end of the year from dr. rowan williams. a short time ago, he told reporters he supports the ordination of women bishops, but he's backing the house of bishops' earlier statement which objected to same-sex marriage. >> i support the house of bishop statement in the summer in answer to the government's consultation on same-sex marriage. but i also know i need to listen very attentively to the lgbt communities and examine my own thinking carefully and prayerfully. i am alza verse to the language of exclusion. ove in the same way as jesus christ loves us. above all, in the church we need to create safe spaces for these issues to be discussed in honesty and in love. >> the soon-to-be archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, there. i'm joined by the bbc's emily buchanan
to be ready to go to the mat to make sure the assad regime will stay in power. that is russia and iran. the result could be an assad that stays in power, an iranian victory that will mark the good for our efforts to move iran to the negotiating table on nuclear weapons, and, in wide portions of syria, and no man's land like the somalia were militants associate with al-qaeda will find a new home. we already see some of this. this is another reason why the administration needs to engage through military means of necessary directly or indirectly providing weapons and things like no-fly zones. we need to do more urgently and this thing will slip out of control. at best, in syria, we will see an emerging shia-sunni fissure across the middle east that will be followed by fighting. but a touch on iraq -- it has not received too much commentary you -- either in the debates in the campaign or even in some of the discussions about the post-election foreign policy priority but it needs to be a priority for several reasons. iraq is a success. it is because of the efforts of the united states and o
, whether that's the multi-lateral process with russia, china, britain, fans, and germany involved, but also possibly see if there should be direct talks between the united states and iran. we haven't had those kind of talks really in three decades since the iranian revolution started, and i suspect, suzanne, he will have bipartisan support for that in washington d.c. and he will have a lot of support internationally now that the campaign is over. the big question is whether the iranian government will be willing to come in a serious way to the negotiating table. they have not shown that over the last couple of years. i think the pressure is actually going to be on the iranian government. >> do you think that the economic pressure on iran is coming to a breaking point here, a boiling point, where you will see iran come to the table? >> i think the sanctions are beginning to hit the iranian government very hard. both the e.u., oil embargo, the u.s. central bank sanctions, and just look at the indicators of that. the iranian riel, the -- it has been -- the ranian have been hit hard in their in
critical level. this here comment usaid was booted out of russia initially when i went there to help the russian people, one of the first things they did with the help of the russians to two extreme poverty. my question is, is the risk too much for us so that we would basically go winhelp the nation and state thank you and don't let the door hit you on the way out? thank you. >> first of all, the indonesian case, part of that is just cultural. they are far more sensitive to questions of faith than we are. so it's not infrequent that we would behave in a way that doesn't take into account adequately their cultural sensitivities. but this happens all the time in life and i think you have to ask yourself what's the right thing to do and you try and do it. if you make your very best effort and someone isn't appreciative, you didn't do anything wrong. don't worry about it. and sometimes that happens. i wouldn't hesitate to help people because someone related to a recipient is resentful that they weren't helped by their own kind. i would want to help. >> if i could have something to the in
, and he certainly came out fighting in this interview with russia today. english language russian tv station. not only that absolute refusal to resign and seek exile that you just heard. but also a stark warning to the the west, not to try to intervene militarily in syria. listen. >> i think the price of this invasion, if it happens, is going to be -- whole world are can't afford if you have a problem in syria -- in the region and coexistent let's say. it will have domino effect. effect the world from the atlantic to the pacific. and, you know, the implication [inaudible] >> of course, u.s. officials have no appetite whatsoever for any kind of military action in syria on that at least president assad is correct. russians are frankly still the problem here. >> absolutely. more support for assad from russian officials. in this case today, the foreign minister sergei said that the west simply has to accept that assad is not going to step aside. and if western powers keep insisting that the price is, as he put it, assad's head, it will simply cost more syrian lives. now, russian official
to go into exile. he spoke in an interview with "russia today.v." earlier this week, british prime minister david cameron suggested giving assad safe passage out of syria, if that would guarantee an end to the war. but the syrian leader flatly rejected the idea. he said, "i am syrian and i will live and die in syria." those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: after the vote, where does the republican party go from here? one thing it clearly faces: a changing electorate. exit polls showed that mitt romney lost every demographic-- blacks, hispanics, and asians-- other than white voters, who favored the republican nominee. romney won among older voters, buthe esident led among those under age 44. and he captured 60% of the 18- to 29-year-old vote, which turned out in greater numbers than in 2008. exit polls also sampled attitudes on the tea party. 21% said they support the movement. 30% opposed it and 42% declared themselves neutral. we do our own sampling now, with three party members: leslie sanchez, a republican strategist and author of "los republican
look at the consequences for russia, this is not just a regional question. it is about the relationship with another superpower, with the u.n. i am sure that a good percentage of the people here, when bush acted to go to war without a un resolution, they were very uneasy, but now, we find people saying, "maybe obama should do it," for different reasons. it is not tied to the election. the election is not going to solve the problem for them. >> let me also say i agree, 100%. do not get me wrong. i do not think that us going in and invading is going to change perceptions. either way, there is going to be these perceptions. helping syria is by no means going to change the perception that we helped some countries because of resources versus others -- that we help some countries because of resources versus others. >> i see no such trend in the country. i just do not see any public support for it. i think shibley has got it right. intervention would make things worse for syria and for us. you ask what is going to look like in a year, and i push it out five years. i think we are looking at a c
in the russians had behaved, i don't think we can give up on russia because they do know the syrian military there in getting bashar al-assad out of the country is not going to solve all the problems. if he leaves, particularly if he were to leave tomorrow, let's say, you would have fragmentation in syria for both sides this is an existential struggle. and alawite dominated army is not going to give up because bashar gave up. and the competition is not going to lay down their arms because bashar less. so i think we very much, if there's going to be any hope for resolution that keeps syria impact for the time being we need the russians, and we need putin, and we need them to recognize that their nihilistic attitude right now doesn't play well. and i would suggest that a number of countries might do better by putting pressure on russia rather than excoriating the united states. i do believe in military intervention. i think we could very well find ourselves backing one side and then only to find that we're incapable of stopping them from occurring the other side if they defeat them. we've seen
to end up like russia. there are thousands of family in cincinnati that have led from socialism. if we have obama as president socialism will be in the united states. host: less of a map to get a sense of where the candidates have been. -- let's look at a map to get a sense of where the candidates have been. all the candidates have been crisscrossing ohio. the other battleground states colorado, iowa, and now wisconsin. minnesota is in play. a romney in pennsylvania. the states of getting the most attention since the party conventions. they have been traveling to a total of 10 states. later this afternoon we will have live coverage of bombing donald. he will be joined by two of the romney sons. they are in virginia. good afternoon. caller: hello. i voted for obama because i am highly impressed with his leadership and the leadership he has shown throughout his administration. i am also impressed with his vice-president mr. joe biden. they work together as a team. we need to finish what we started. i also enjoyed listening to mr. biden's comment today about mitt romney. he said mitt romn
in power and maintain control over at least part of syria and that of course is russia and iran and the result would be al-assad steven pour and the victory which is not going to be good for our simultaneous efforts to try to move iran to the negotiating table to seize the nuclear weapons, and in white portions of syria, a no-man's land rather like the fata of somalia where the militants perhaps probably associated with al qaeda would find a new home. we already see some of this. this is another reason why the administration needs to engage in putting in beijing through military means if necessary the merkley or indirectly through providing weapons and things like no-fly zones. we need to do more and we need to do more urgently or this is great to slip out of control. at best -- and it isn't very good at sifry at salles -- at worst we are going to see any emerging sunni shia fisher across the middle east would be followed by violence and fighting in iraq and elsewhere. let me touch on iraq. it hasn't received too much commentary either in the debates in the campaign or even some
that are of concern to the u.s.. when you look at the consequences for russia, i mean this is not just a regional question. it is about the relationship with another superpower with the u.n.. it's interesting, i am sure that a good percentage of the people here, when bush asked to go to war in iraq without a resolution we are very uncomfortable asking without the resolution and yet we find people now saying maybe obama should do it but for different reasons. i think it's a really big problem for the administration. it's not tied to the election. i think the elections and themselves have problems. >> actually a cautious approach example. >> let me say i agree 100%. don't get me wrong. i don't think us going in and invading, either way there are going to be these perceptions along with the perception of the positive images of the west i was helping syria is by no means going to change the perceptions that we help some countries because of resources versus others. i agree with that 100%. >> i think there's a growing trend in kind -- inside of washington to favor intervention in syria, some kind of
that tokyo, st. petersburg, russia london the netherlands, all of them have some sort of storm surge barrier. but they are pricey. we're talking about however, $50 billion storm called sandy. >> where could they be built? >> realize that new york city is a victim of geography. it's like a funnel. if you have a gigantic storm coming in from the atlantic the power is concentrated as it goes past sandy point where it can savage staten island, inundate wall street and a second surge can come from the east river. so we need a barrier that gives us a comprehensive protection against this kind of storm surge. >> how much would it cost? >> well, we're talking about the fact that each of these barriers could cost about $1 billion. the whole thing would cost on the order of $10 billion, perhaps even $15 billion. >> show us how it works. >> here's how it works. there are three choke points whereby can you actually stop a storage surge. first, it's around arthur kill here around staten island. the other is around the verazano bridge. third, around the east river. each of these would
. realize that tokyo, st. petersburg russia have storm surge barriers but they are pricey. >> where could they be built? >> realize that new york city is like a funnel. if you have a gigantic storm coming in from the atlantic it's power is concentrated as it goes past sandy point where it can savage staten island, inundate wall street and a second surge can come in from the east river. so we need a barrier that gives us a comprehensive protection against this kind of storm surge. >> how much it would cost? >> well we're talking about the fact that each of these barriers could cost a billion. the whole thing would cost 10 billion even $15 billion. >> show us how it wosrks. >> there's three choke points where you could stop a storm surge. here around arctic hill. next near the verrazano-narrows bridge and the next one is here. if you want the cadillac you want to put one between sandy hook and the rockaways. that would cost on the order of $6 billion. >> sthalt money well spent >> think of it as an insurance policy because the whole package could go over $10 billion. but hey that's church c
at the consequences for russia, i mean, this is not just a regional question. it is about the relationship with another superpower with the u.n.. really, you know, it's interesting. i'm sure that a good percentage of the people here, when bush acted to go to war in iraq, were very uncomfortable acting, and, yesterday, we find people now saying maybe obama should do it for a different reason so i think it's a really big problem for the administration. it's not due to the electionment eng the election is not going to solve that problem for them. it's not a political -- >> actually -- >> a cautious approach -- >> exactly. >> i agree 100%, don't get me wrong. i don't think we could win; right? us invading is going to change perceptions, i agree, but either way, there's going to be these perceptions along with the perceptions of the positive images of the west. us helping syria is by no means going to change the perceptions that we helped some countries because of resources versus others. i agree with that 1 # 00%. >> i think there is a growing trends inside of washington in favor of some inter
with the russians on making sure their interests are addressed in syria. i do not think russia is wedded to assad. may be establishing a no-fly zone from turkey, may be providing direct military assistance, but something to break the region's debt lot. syria cannot afford for a long time much of the destruction that it is undertaking. my last point has to do with peace. rob cover this up. i have said this for awhile and i will say it again, very and diplomatically, it is peace now or never. i understand all the difficulties that the u.s. president will face in trying to bring this to conflict resolution. i understand the priority of this issue is not in terms of other u.s. priorities domestically. i understand the president is facing hard-line israeli government not interested in my view in 8 two-state solution that is viable, a week palestinian government that does not have what it takes to come to an arrangement. i understand all this. i also understand if something drastic is not done today, we will lose this opportunity probably forever. one has to choose between the difficult and the impossi
it to obviously her area of expertise is russia. it felt to me like this piece was almost fatalistic. she is calling for more american help, she is calling for a greater american leadership role but it sended to me, read to me like she really didn't expect that to happen. in that sense i agree with her. if you look at the campaign we've just been through the president of the united states and his vice president ran on a campaign that embraced this idea of leading from behind. they believe this is working, they believe this is successful. i think the opposite, it seems very clear that secretary rice believes the opposite. i don't think that we are likely to see the united states take a more significant role in the region any time soon, given the way that the president and joe biden ran for the past year. martha: there may be an irony in the fact that susan rice, who is being considered as the next secretary of state, you know, sort of failed to see the broader picture in what happened at benghazi and we wonder what the direction of the next secretary of state would be. i just put that out
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)